Happy Surprises in Goblin Valley

For our trip to Utah, we used Goblin Valley State Park as our base camp for our adventures.  For “just” a state park, it’s pretty cool.  In fact, we loved this park and its surroundings so much we wished we had more time to spend in the state park itself!

This park is truly in the middle of nowhere (just how we like our campgrounds & hiking!) – about 2 hours from Moab.  The scenery in the park and all around was simply spectacular.  The landscape was certainly what we expect to see when we’re in eastern Utah, but in some ways it was even more interesting since it’s near the San Rafael Swell.  Tons of colors in the land and curves and shapes and shadows all around.  Really a delight.

A Swell Swell View

After our adventures in Little Wild Horse Canyon that same morning, we dried out enough to go exploring in the afternoon and see what this goblins thing was all about.  What better place to check things out than the aptly named Observation Point?

We pulled into the trailhead and, oh wow… there be goblins!

The Goblins

The little rock formations were all over the canyon floor as far as you could see in so many directions.  They were so funky and mesmerizing.  They reminded me a lot of the drip sand castles we would make as kids at the beach with really watery mud.  Hikers are allowed to wander through the goblins to their hearts’ content, so I was disappointed we didn’t have more days in our schedule to play around down there with the camera.  Maybe next time…

Our plan for the afternoon was an easy hike out to Goblin’s Lair.  Even though we were leaving the lil’ goblins behind, there was still plenty to see along the way.  Simply stunning country all around and a gorgeous day t’boot…

A Tower of Goblins

The terrain along the hike was pretty gentle.  A little steep getting into the valley, then it flattened out for most of the way making for an easy walk to Goblin’s Lair.  Good thing too because with my boots still soaked from the pools in Little Wild Horse Canyon, I was hiking in my barely-any-tread-left Teva sandals and socks!  (Super stylish, I know.)

The terrain changed swiftly when we reached the lair.  We had to climb some really steep rocks & boulders.  Tricky enough when you’re wearing boots with good tread while carrying a big camera, even more so when you’re in your reserve campsite-only sandals.

I did trek up to the mouth of the lair – slowly – and I made it with both myself and the camera in one piece.  We took a peek inside the Lair itself and found that you could climb down into this big, dark cavern that only had a small shaft of light coming in from a hole in the rock above.  It looked awesome, but I didn’t want to chance it with my iffy footing and equipment.  My husband though?  He climbed down in there.

He said it was awesome & a little spooky.  It was easy to see why the lore of this site revolves around it being the origin of the goblins in the valley.  Not too much see in the way of pictures though since it was so dark in the cave, but he said it was really cool to experience.  (Dammit!  Next time I’ll keep my boots dry!)

So what did I do while I was waiting for my husband to finish exploring in the dark other than worry about him getting in and out of there safely?  Take pictures, of course!  With the time of day and the angle of the sun, the lighting was fairly extreme and tough to balance, but I did like one shot I came away with there from just outside of the Lair.  It seemed fitting for the entrance to a “lair”…

Into the Lair

Heading out to Goblin’s Lair was a nice end to a fantastic day in the valley.  Even though I missed the main attraction on this particular hike, we still got treated to some more stupendous views on the way back to the trailhead.

Out to Molly's Castle

Based on this first full day in the park alone, it’s safe to say Goblin Valley is somewhere we’ll wind up again in the future.  Lots of good stuff yet to be explored & photographed, and our stay here is only halfway over!  Horseshoe Canyon is yet to come…

– JC

Marmot Peek-a-Boo

A few weeks ago we headed up to Rocky Mountain National Park for a hike up to Lawn Lake.  It’s a trail we haven’t done in a few years, even though we really enjoyed the trip the one and only time we’d gone up there.  The hike isn’t steep, but it is very long – we clocked nearly 14 miles by the time our day was done!

This time around, I was crazy enough to take the big camera with me for the entire trek, only adding weight to the pack I had to carry.  No worries though because it meant more calories burned (which translates into less guilt over celebratory food & beverages afterward!) and I was rewarded with some fun with a marmot.

The hike up was uneventful.  Gorgeous, but uneventful.  Not a ton of wildlife, but plenty of scenery and wildflowers in bloom…

…some shadows out to play along the Rolling River…

Shadows & Rocks

…and some downed trees that made for an abstract that I can’t help but think looks like a rhino or a triceratops tilting its angry head.

Creatures in Wood

Lawn Lake is spectacular on an average day.  Add the fabulous weather we had and it was simply scrumptious!

Approaching Lawn Lake

While we were plopped down on the lake shore for a spot of lunch, I got inspired.  The rocks on the opposite side of the lake – for some reason – every time I looked at them, I kept thinking they looked painted.  That gave me a post-processing idea… once I got home, I tossed the Photoshop oil paint filter on it and voila!  Not quite what I pictured in my mind, but it still came out funky, especially with what it did to the grasses and pines along the shore:

Oil Painted Rocks

If it seems like I’m glossing over the hike, I sorta am, but for good reason.  Not only can I say “it’s so gorgeous up there” so many times and bore even myself, but also we had more fun on the way down the trail after lunch thanks to a new marmot friend we made during a lengthy game of peek-a-boo!

I saw the little guy scoot across the trail about 25 yards ahead of us and park himself in a set of boulders on the side of the trail.  Knowing that marmots tend to graze in and around rocks scrounging for little bits of lichen and mosses, I knew he’d be back out, so I started to get into position for when he did.

Bingo!  Oh, hello there…

Why, Hello...

Clearly I’d been spotted, but he didn’t run away.  Knowing that they can be skittish and don’t move nearly as fast as say, a chipmunk, I bided my time.  Each time he popped back into his little hiding spot, I slowly crept up another step or two to get closer to him.  (I always keep a healthy and respectable distance away from critters, balancing not spooking them with where I need to be for grabbing a shot.)

Every time after I’d step forward, I’d see a little nose pop out and check out the situation:

Still There?

After about 15 minutes of this dance, I think he decided to “smile” (unlikely) or was simply annoyed with my presence and my taking so many shots of him:

Smiling

And with that, we bid each other adieu and everyone went about their day:

Bye Now

Another successful day on the trails in the books!

– JC

The Building Pictures Project

(Originally posted May 6, 2013)

(Yes, it’s been forever and a day since I was last able to post – more on that at the end of this entry.  Consider yourself teased!)

The next project on the A to Z list was for Building Pictures.  This technique is as simple or as difficult as you want to make it.  It’s all about taking a picture (or two) and using bits and pieces to get the result you saw in your mind, but maybe couldn’t quite achieve straight out of the camera because you couldn’t get the angle you wanted, people were in the way, you didn’t have access to a viewpoint… You know, those “little” things that can sometimes get in the way of snagging the perfect shot.

I think the hardest part about this project for me was simply finding a picture to build off of.  A lot of my shots are of nature or everyday mundane things, and nothing was really jumping out at me as the “cornerstone” for this project.  That was until I walked into my home office and looked at my black & white print of the rocks of Park Avenue at Arches National Park in Utah.  I adore that picture as it is, but then I thought to myself, “Why not double the goodness?”  Working with the original color version of the shot would also mix things up a little.

So here’s what the “cornerstone” building block image looked like:

Arches National Park - Park Avenue (Original Shot)

(Not bad, if I do say so myself!)

Building a picture can be as simple as duplicating the image, flipping it around, lining things up and voila!  You end up with a result like this one, where (to me) I feel like I’m being drawn into the picture as my eyes and mind try to play tricks on me:

Arches National Park - Park Avenue (Built Image)

As one friend put it, it looks like a landscape Rorschach!  (And I have to say I agree with him!)

Building a picture – if you have a good foundation shot to start with – doesn’t take long at all to change things up and create some new art!

 

– JC

 

PS – So the reasons/excuses for the delay in blog posts is simple – we’re moving!  Our house sold lightening-fast (thankfully!) and it’s been a whirlwind for the last few weeks.  We’re settling into packing mode now for the move in July, so I’ll try to post every now and then in spite of what’s bound to be a hectic summer!  Once we’ve landed, unpacked, and I get setup, you can bet I’ll be playing catch-up… and sharing new images of our new surroundings (which promise to be a big change from where we’ve called home the last 10+ years!).